Here’s what you need to know before taking your first trip abroad

Traveling abroad for the first time is always an exciting prospect, but it’s also something you need to prepare extensively for.

Planning well in advance will keep you from getting overwhelmed.

 

Taking your first trip abroad?

 

The prospect can be as exciting as it is intimidating.

 

A new country means a new culture, unique cuisine, and sometimes even a new language!

 

What’s there not to like?

 

With so much excitement, however, it’s easy to miss a few key details that can complicate your trip.

 

Luckily, we’ve got you covered, and we’ve compiled a list of tips to help this trip start and finish as successfully as possible.

 

Let’s get started!

 

Don’t leave your passport for last!

 

This one may seem like a no-brainer, but you’d be surprised by how many leave acquiring their passports to the very last moment!

 

If you’re planning to go abroad, no matter where you go, this should be the very first thing you acquire. Yes, even before your plane tickets or making reservations in a hotel.

 

As of 2019, once you’ve finished all the steps necessary, you can get a passport in a little over two weeks.

 

Once it’s in your hands, then you can start planning.

 

Find out whether you need a visa.

 

Not so fast!

 

Some countries out there require you to get a visa, so once again, before you start making any serious plans, do a little research on this subject.

 

Sometimes you can get the visa in advance; sometimes you need to go to your consulate and sometimes the country you want to go to will let you acquire a visa at the airport.

 

The process can be very different from country to country, so it pays to do your research well in advance.

 

Choose your destination wisely.

 

Now that you have your passport and visa, the world is your oyster. All you need to do is choose your destination.

 

First-time travelers tend to want to stick close to home, so they choose countries they can get to in just a couple of hours; Others are a bit more adventurous and cross entire oceans to get somewhere else.

 

Regardless of where you want to go, ask yourself these questions:

 

  • Do I know the local language?
  • Do I know anyone in the country I’m visiting?
  • Do I know anything about the local culture?
  • Do I have a way to communicate with my friends and family?
  • Do I have access to an interpreter?

 

Answering no to these questions shouldn’t stop you from traveling abroad, but the more of these questions you can reply with a yes, the easier traveling will be.

 

Get familiar with the currency.

 

Before you leave your country, make sure you understand how the currency of the country you’re traveling with works.

 

You don’t want to depend on the kindness and honesty of strangers.

 

Get familiar with the bills, the coins, the value of each, and the average costs of basic things; If possible, exchange your money before you get to the new country and practice with it to really get the hang of it.

 

While you’re at it, you should also find out whether you can use your credit or debit card there and whether you can use the local ATM’s.

 

The more knowledgeable you are about this subject, the easier it will be to move around.

Traveling Abroad With Your Dog

More and more people are choosing to travel abroad with their dog in search of new adventures, but while this can be a fantastic bonding experience, it can be pretty
tricky if you’re not prepared.

Dogs have gone from being man’s best friend to being part of the family and, which means traveling without them is falling out of style. While taking your dog along when running errands or even letting them join you at  work is commonplace, taking them abroad is a whole other ballpark.

Luckily, things are getting more manageable in this respect, but there’s still a lot  you need to consider. If you’re thinking about traveling abroad with your dog, you should consider these  things:

DO YOUR RESEARCH
Let’s cut right to the chase. Not all countries are as pet-friendly as the United  States.

While pet culture is spreading around the globe, a lot of countries still consider them “just animals,” which means your dog might not receive a warm welcome.

A quick research on how dogs are treated in your destination is a must, as you want  to know how easy (or hard) it will be to find dog-friendly places.

If the country, you plan to visit doesn’t have a dog culture you might even have to consider leaving your dog behind. After all, traveling all the way to a new country only to stay in a strange room all day long can be scary for any dog.

GET A PET PASSPORT
Yes, dogs need passports too.

Dog passports are issued by specialized veterinarians and contain proof that your  dog is healthy, vaccinated and meets all requirements to travel abroad.

Ask your vet about getting a passport. If they can’t issue one, chances are they know someone who can.

While you’re at it, get your dog a checkup and, if he isn’t, make sure to microchip them, as that’s another requirement your dog needs to meet.  Plan Accordingly

PLAN ACCORDINGLY

We’re not talking just pet-friendly accommodations here. We’re talking the whole vacation.

Your dog is traveling with you, so make sure they have fun too!

Make a list of nearby parks, pet-friendly restaurants and cafés, pet shops, dog parks and anywhere else your four-legged friend would like to visit.

Sure, your dog will be happy to be by your side no matter where you go, but who doesn’t like being treated to fun activities now and then?

PLAN FOR THE WORST

Yes, that seems a little dramatic, but it’s not as bad as it sounds.

Yes, a new country means adventure, it also means unique flora and fauna, some of which can be dangerous for your dog.

The stress of the trip and the new environment can also lead to some problems you  weren’t expecting and if that wasn’t enough, well, let’s face it: Accidents happen.

While a positive mentality and a can-do attitude can take you very far, it pays to have some contingencies in place just in case things don’t go as planned, so we suggest you find a vet well in advance of taking your dog abroad.

Knowing a vet in the country you’re visiting is also a fantastic way of ensuring your  dog has fun during your vacations, as no one is more familiar with the best hang-out spots for dogs than those who work with them.